Boeing stock short sales history

The Boeing 787 could be the most profitable aircraft ever for Boeing, according to one aerospace analyst, but short-selling the stock is at its highest level ever.

Boeing stock short sales have fluctuated with the rise and fall of expectations on the 787 program. Here is the history since the airplane was launched in 2004 through July 15, 2009.

Date Short Sales Ratio
1/15/2004 9,934,562 3.183
2/13/2004 8,997,109 2.705
3/15/2004 11,518,279 3.456
4/15/2004 8,623,788 2.981
5/14/2004 9,680,732 3.471
6/15/2004 11,880,726 3.456
7/15/2004 10,594,443 3.119
8/13/2004 9,119,201 2.844
9/15/2004 11,509,781 3.942
10/15/2004 11,318,199 3.703
11/15/2004 10,447,036 2.87
12/15/2004 8,447,459 2.646
1/14/2005 7,500,530 2.58
2/15/2005 10,492,172 2.782
3/15/2005 9,954,401 2.279
4/15/2005 10,673,540 2.831
5/13/2005 8,843,112 2.073
6/15/2005 10,029,361 2.617
7/15/2005 9,393,738 1.963
8/15/2005 7,920,009 2.65
9/15/2005 7,645,431 2.261
10/14/2005 9,588,986 2.494
11/15/2005 7,902,447 1.615
12/15/2005 8,352,224 2.274
1/13/2006 8,784,990 2.546
2/15/2006 5,771,528 1.403
3/15/2006 6,410,190 2.231
4/13/2006 6,128,900 2.007
5/15/2006 7,168,978 1.898
6/15/2006 7,963,828 1.842
7/14/2006 7,411,866 1.755
8/15/2006 5,633,771 1.255
9/15/2006 4,782,549 1.306
10/13/2006 5,765,023 1.303
11/15/2006 6,705,877 1.403
12/15/2006 5,868,499 1.305
1/12/2007 6,820,771 2.267
2/15/2007 4,707,111 1.004
3/15/2007 6,508,362 1.507
4/13/2007 6,060,810 1.651
5/15/2007 8,564,107 1.935
6/15/2007 8,359,192 2.034
7/13/2007 8,979,477 1.999
8/15/2007 8,569,445 1.498
9/14/2007 8,206,978 1.578
9/28/2007 10,156,453 1.828
10/15/2007 8,370,073 1.016
10/31/2007 8,689,757 1.116
11/15/2007 7,864,579 1.32
11/30/2007 7,739,536 1.051
12/14/2007 6,631,143 0.825
12/31/2007 5,663,877 1.287
1/15/2008 6,772,141 0.824
1/31/2008 7,632,416 0.807
2/15/2008 9,889,188 1.738
2/29/2008 9,934,522 1.71
3/14/2008 10,014,434 1.057
3/31/2008 10,181,441 1.604
4/15/2008 11,243,306 1.589
4/30/2008 12,827,210 1.956
5/15/2008 10,028,889 2.186
5/30/2008 10,168,588 1.74
6/13/2008 11,186,312 1.492
6/30/2008 9,280,173 1.042
7/15/2008 7,790,125 1.012
7/31/2008 9,646,137 1.216
8/15/2008 8,079,154 1.045
8/29/2008 6,340,486 1.322
9/15/2008 9,016,436 1.206
9/30/2008 9,283,575 1.078
10/15/2008 10,564,489 0.905
10/31/2008 12,038,905 1.153
11/14/2008 11,406,832 1.233
11/28/2008 12,691,818 1.348
12/15/2008 11,728,292 1.393
12/31/2008 13,736,728 2.288
1/15/2009 14,837,709 2.248
1/30/2009 13,145,717 1.783
2/13/2009 14,316,161 2.03
2/27/2009 13,377,523 1.47
3/13/2009 19,354,848 1.774
3/31/2009 21,755,352 2.204
4/15/2009 18,468,141 2.459
4/30/2009 17,647,205 2.33
5/15/2009 18,637,719 2.755
5/29/2009 16,573,483 3.324
6/15/2009 22,406,715 2.864
6/30/2009 21,978,723 2.05
7/15/2009 22,989,937 3.35

3 Comments on “Boeing stock short sales history

  1. Says to me the hedge funds and day traders are calling the tune on BA.

    Sort of a sorry state that an industrial like BA, one half of an effective duopoly is such a short play.

    Worse yet is the idea that it’s become a bad long bet, and that used to be the way to play it. It was as close to a sure thing going long as there was.

    Things have changed.

    Much Higher and I’ll be buying puts myself.

  2. The Seattle Times has a very interesting follow-up
    article, dated July 30th, 2009, titled
    “Boeing 787 wing flaw extends inside plane”
    Link (shortened): http://tinyurl.com/kqkazn

    There the Seattle Times admits they earlier had
    reported wrongly.
    The structural flaws (and delamination) at the
    787 Dreamliner are not only in the wings, but
    also inside the plane, in the fuselage/center
    wing box.
    And the stress test did not fail at 150% of
    nominal load limit, but already at slightly above
    100% of nominal load limit !
    This is why Boeing did not dare to carry out a
    maiden flight. Under these circumstances, it
    would have been far too risky and dangerous.

  3. The Seattle Times article is a must-read; there’s lots of chatter inside the company about who blabbed but the bottom line is, the paper got it right.

    The problem: Boeing Commercial’s bills are now paid by legacy products designed under previous management. Tomorrow’s bills are supposed to be paid by today’s new designs….

    Current management may be very good at streamlining manufacturing, but if they cannot execute a new design, then the company goes bankrupt when its existing designs become obsolete and stop selling. It’s that simple.

    So, you know what’s going to happen, and now you know when.

    For the best information I’ve yet seen on what’s REALLY going on:
    http://rbogash.com/boeing_delay.html

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