Where does Boeing turn?

With delivery delays of around 15 months now expected for the Boeing 787 program, where does Boeing turn to help its customers?

One suggestion was upping the production of the 767, currently at one a month. This won’t work–it takes about two years to do so, according to Boeing. By then the 787 program should be more or less back on track.

A blogger suggested that the 777 could be the answer. Not likely, either, because the 777 has a four year backlog and is being produced at the rate of seven a month, its highest ever.

The used airplane market is very tight. Boeing is looking for 777s, 767s and even Airbus A330s and A340s with little luck.

Boeing and the airlines will have to cope as best they can.

Here’s the backlog chart for Boeing. The production rates are:

737: ~30/mo

747: 1/mo

767: 1/mo

777: 7/mo

787: planned–initially 3/mo, increasing to 10/mo within 18 mo

Unfilled Orders by Model Through February 2008
Model Series Orders Deliveries Unfilled
Total Unfilled Orders 3544
737
737-700 1474 921 553
737-700BBJ 115 94 21
737-700C 12 11 1
737-800 2705 1348 1357
737-800BBJ 17 13 4
737-900BBJ 6 0 6
737-900ER 227 15 212
Total Unfilled for 737 2154
747
747-400ERF 40 31 9
747-400F 126 116 10
747-8 26 0 26
747-8F 78 0 78
Total Unfilled for 747 123
767
767-200ER 121 120 1
767-300ER 538 523 15
767-300F 82 49 33
767-400ER 38 37 1
Total Unfilled for 767 50
777
777-200ER 433 405 28
777-200LR 47 17 30
777-300ER 354 130 224
777F 78 0 78
Total Unfilled for 777 360
787
787-3 43 0 43
787-8 642 0 642
787-9 172 0 172
Total Unfilled for 787 857
Total Unfilled Orders 3544
Model Series Orders Deliveries Unfilled

One Comment on “Where does Boeing turn?

  1. If the customer or Boeing can afford the fuel, it may require a trip to the Arizona desert.
    Lots of airliners there, just old and thirsty.

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