Air Show in Everett

During the Labor Day Weekend, the Historic Flight* based at Paine Field in Everett (WA) held its annual air show. All the warbirds owned by the foundation are airworthy. It’s a small collection but the air show brings in a variety of other planes, nearly all of which are airworthy.

Here are a few of the planes, photos we took this weekend.

This restored Boeing 40C is the oldest Boeing aircraft flying. It’s owned by a company in Oregon.

This ME262 is airworthy. It is a replica, one of five, built from the original blueprints.

The restored Douglas DC-2 is owned by the Museum of Flight. It is airworthy.

This Boeing 247D is also owned by the Museum of Flight, based at Paine Field at the Restoration Center. It was once airworthy but hasn’t flown in years. It was towed across the field for the air show.

The B-25 Mitchell is the Foundation’s pride and joy. (Photo by the Foundation.)

*Historic Flight is not to be confused with the Historical Flight Foundation, which owns the Douglas DC-7B we flew on last May (Story 1 and Story 2).

9 Comments on “Air Show in Everett

  1. Great airplanes, great show. Is the Me-262 replica one of the ones that began building in Fort Worth, before it was moved, and completed in Seattle?

      • Thanks, Uwe. I had been watching the Me-262 project, but I lost track of it after it moved from Fort Worth to Seattle. It is great to see one of them is flying in Germany, where she really belongs. But, I believe there was a tail dragger model before the Me-262-A1, or these tail draggers were the A-1a (Juno-004 engines) and converted to have a NLG. Didn’t the tail drag version have to have the brakes briefly applied on take-off roll to get the tail up so it could get airborne?

        Yes, I knew the project would only have 5 airplanes, total.

        • My understanding is that the taildragger version was a real PITA to get off the ground,
          an on occasion lifethreatening challenge for newbie pilots.
          It would have been madness imho to replicate the early taildragger for flyable frames.

          aside: Pure War Bird interest in Germany isn’t all that great. though LH’s “civil” Ju52 is
          a very popular exhibit ( for looking at and flying with ). An FW-200 is in the works and
          some prewar GA aircraft. I would be interested in some working Jumo Diesel engine with
          associated plane ( mabe a Ha 139 to show off the Europe to SouthAmerica postal service
          routes from the prewar era )

    • Uwe :
      I would be interested in some working Jumo Diesel engine with
      associated plane ( mabe a Ha 139 to show off the Europe to SouthAmerica postal service
      routes from the prewar era )

      uwe, that period between the wars fascinates me. i’ve been prowling historic sites showing the ju8nkers expansion into russia and south america which is little-known here. dr. junkers was a real businessman as well as a innovative engineer.

      • IMHO the most interesting part is that Junkers essentially had his path scientifically laid down in the early 1910 years.
        Develop aerodynamics and windtunnel technology.
        Develop full metal non wired construction methods.
        Develop efficient engine technology.
        All done on a steady incremental path.
        After WWI: don’t get entagled by Versailles treaty limitations.

  2. KC135TopBoom :
    Great airplanes, great show. Is the Me-262 replica one of the ones that began building in Fort Worth, before it was moved, and completed in Seattle?

    yes, exactly. the story is on the ‘stormbirds’ website– http://www.stormbirds.com/project/index.html .
    i saw the birds at meacham field in their earliest days, then a decade later at everett– just walked into the hangar and asked to visit some old friends.
    also happened to stand in car rental line with the CAPT Czaia, AA pilot that made first test flights, heard tales from him of meeting and talking to first german pilots tthat flew -262s.
    fascinating story, both original design & production and these jeweled reproductions. beautiful, deadly birds.

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