Repost: Pratt & Whitney GTF program update at PNAA conference, plus Q&A PW, RR and GE

Due to technical issues we don’t begin to understand, the PW GTF engine program update didn’t display the videos, only the links. We are re-posting to correct the situation because we couldn’t fix it within the original post.

Bob Saia, VP of Next Generation Engine development at Pratt & Whitney, provides a program update of the Geared Turbo Fan engine and its prospect of growing into a “Big Engine” serving the twin-aisle market. He appeared at the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance 2014 conference in the Seattle area last week.

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[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYUUtVEKhIs]

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Questions and Answers

The following videos are questions and answers of the representatives of the Big Three engine manufacturers. Sound is soft on these two videos; best to use headphones.

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[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nArLnhsMraE]

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[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Wtqr4FavP0]

5 Comments on “Repost: Pratt & Whitney GTF program update at PNAA conference, plus Q&A PW, RR and GE

  1. no way again to open the first Q & A video! “private”
    Frustrating!
    however it seems clear that PRATT has its plate full satisfying all its orders for the various SA GTF
    and, if I understood well, the WB GTF EIS is around 2022????
    A bit too late for the 330 NEO???

  2. It would be interesting to know how far the current PW1100 80inch GTF can be grown. I think the GTF was dimensioned to also power the light twin Boeing NSA, when that was still on the agenda.
    http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/gtf-able-to-power-twin-aisle-narrowbody-pratt-amp-338925/

    If they can up the thrust on the PW1100 further from the current 33klbs for the A321NEO to e.g. 38klbs that would be a good starting point for medium variants of the A320 family.
    http://www.cardatabase.net/modifiedairlinerphotos/photos/big/00015369.jpg

    • Thanks for the weblink, keesje !

      An excerpt of what Bob Saia told ATI + Flightglobal journalists in interview in Dallas late 2010 : Quote/ These airlines are interested in an aircraft with an “[Airbus] A320, A321 capacity, so 170-220 seating capacity” that offers twin-aisle configuration … the reason for the twin aisle is two-fold – cabin comfort, but another is you can turn the aircraft around faster in terms of boarding and de-boarding. /Unquote

      Very precisely, H21QR but even better, H22QR (@ Airbus) and/or H52QR+H53QR (@ Boeing) fit in with those airline desiderata :
      – H21QR : 170 – 200 seats (33 klbf thrust is OK)
      – H22QR : 200 – 230 seats (38-40 klbf thrust ?)
      – H52QR : 185 – 215 seats (37-40 klbf thrust ?)
      – H53QR : 205 – 235 seats (39-42 klbf thrust ?)
      (NB : in theory, the last three types allow common engine ratings with A34X NEO)

  3. Airbus discussing A330, A380 re/engining. Reading between the lines a NEO seems almost a done deal.

    `Williams does not see a common new engine for the A330 and A380 as the optimal solution. Concerns include the sizing of the core and overall architecture, as well as weight. “It really does not make much sense,” he believes. He says Pratt & Whitney “is very interested” to offer a geared turbofan engine, while Rolls-Royce and General Electric (GE) could offer bleed versions of the Trent 1000 and the GEnx-1B, respectively.`

    http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.aspx?id=/article-xml/awx_02_14_2014_p0-664251.xml&p=2

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