Paris Air Show, Day 3: A320, 737 production rates of 50+ seen

Highlights from the show, as we see it:

  • Boeing said the entry-in-service for the 737 MAX will be accelerated from the fourth quarter 2017 to the third quarter. Southwest Airlines of the USA is the first operator. Bloomberg reported this is a six month acceleration, but we believe this is no more than three months at the outside. We had EIS for October 2017. Ascend data base shows the first delivery now for September 2017 and a total of four in 2017, the latter unchanged from when we wrote a story for Flight Global about the order from Southwest.
  • Update on the above item: Boeing has clarified that citing “six” months was a mis-speak; the EIS moves from Q4 to Q3 [along the lines we’ve written–editor].
  • The long-awaited order for Airbus A350s from Air France finally happened.
  • Ryanair firmed up its order for 175 737-800s.
  • Airbus says it’s alerted suppliers about the prospect of boosting A320 production to 50/mo by 2020. Boeing didn’t reveal at the air show (as far as we can tell from news reports) but our Market Intelligence tells us that Boeing has alerted suppliers about the prospect of boosting 737 production to 52/mo by 2019.
  • For all the hoopla of the Embraer E-Jet E2 launch, most of the orders and commitments were for the smallest E-175 E2.

7 Comments on “Paris Air Show, Day 3: A320, 737 production rates of 50+ seen

  1. What’s the issue with getting the Max 8 to 199 seats? I would have thought with new seating arrangements it should be possible? Is there a certification issue, or would it encroach too much on the Max 9?

  2. “Boeing said the entry-in-service for the 737 MAX will be accelerated from the fourth quarter 2017 to the third quarter.”

    In the aftermath of the 787 production fiasco it seems that Boeing has given itself an unrealistic cushion with the MAX. So much so that it is now forced to review the schedule four years ahead of time. There is probably still quite a bit of margin left in this revised timetable. If so, it is a good thing. For as it has recently been pointed out by Chet Fuller there is a lot of cynicism in the industry right now. No one seems to believe what the manufacturers are promising anymore.

  3. The E2 195 has to beat the CSeries, that most likely has a bigger more efficient wing and engine. 33 rows at 4 abreast is like a mini 757-300. How will they compare on short 1 hour flights?

  4. I think Embraer E2 family positioning went exactly as expected from a marketing perspective.

    The best selling E190 remaining the same (E190-E2, never change a winning team), the smallest E170 being ignored (high per seat costs) and the E175 being slightly stretched into an “E180” (E175-E2) and the E195 being upgraded into an “E200” (E195-E2) that really competes with the CS100 and smallest NB’s.

    The IMO optimal E180 – E190 – E200 build up.

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