Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 16.

April 3, 2020, ©. Leeham News: In this week’s Corner, we go deeper into bio-based carbon-neutral fuels. We described the two variants of bio-based and synthetic alternative fuels last week and gave an overview of the pros and cons of synthetic fuel.

Now we dig deeper into bio-based airliner jet fuels, an already existing carbon-neutral fuel type.

Figure 1. United is using biofuel for its operations from LAX. Source: United Airlines.

Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 15.

March 27, 2020, ©. Leeham News: In this week’s Corner, we analyze the use of carbon-neutral fuels for airliner use.

Almost all variants of carbon-neutral fuels have the “drop-in” advantage, they can replace our regular jet fuel in a mixed capacity or entirely with none or minimal changes to our present aircraft and their engines.

It’s a big subject, and I will use the next Corners to explain the key alternatives, their production process, and what benefits and problems they bring.

Figure 1. airbp is distributing bio-jet fuel produced by Neste. Source: BP

Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 14.

March 20, 2020, ©. Leeham News: In this week’s Corner, we continue our analysis of what it means for a regional airliner to go from Turbofan propulsion to Hybrid Electric propulsion. Last week, we looked at a Serial Hybrid. Now we analyze a Hybrid where the electric power applies in parallel with the gas turbine power.

Figure 1. Embraer’s E175-E2, a very efficient  88 seater jet. Source: Embraer.

Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 13.

March 13, 2020, ©. Leeham News: In this week’s Corner, we address an often forgotten aspect of Electric and Electric-Hybrid aircraft design.

The battery as an energy source, as the only or assisting source, has the same weight during the whole flight. A fuel (alternate, fossil, or hydrogen) consumes during the flight. You gradually fly a lighter aircraft. Let’s see how this affects the aircraft’s efficiency.

Figure 1. Embraer’s E175-E2, a latest-generation 88 seater jet used for our example. Source: Embraer.

Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 12.

March 6, 2020, ©. Leeham News: We use this week’s Corner to discuss the safety hazards a change to an Electric or Hybrid-Electric airliner introduces.

The trigger is two battery fires in six weeks for the electric aircraft prototypes which are now flooding the market.

Figure 1. Eviation’s Alice battery-driven prototype. Source: Eviation

Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 11.

February 28, 2020, ©. Leeham News: We now look at technology developments that make sense, and can deliver real improvements in the near future.

We start in this Corner with what more electric aircraft and engines can bring.

Figure 1. Boeing’s 787, the first more electric airliner. Source: Boeing.

Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 9.

February 14, 2020, ©. Leeham News: Last week we started looking at hydrogen as an alternative energy source for our air transport system. We discussed the use of hydrogen as a direct fuel replacement to jet fuel, burning the hydrogen in the combustor of the aircraft’s turbofans.

Hydrogen works fine as a fuel for the turbofan but it has challenges in its onboard storage, it’s handling and production. Good reader discussions followed around those problems. Now we look at hydrogen as a fuel in a fuel cell/electrical motor propulsion system.

Figure 1. Components of a fuel cell-based aircraft propulsion system. Source: NASA.

Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 8.

February 7, 2020, ©. Leeham News: After discussing established ways of improving the environmental footprint of our air transport system and highlighting the challenges involved with an electric/hybrid route we now look at hydrogen as an alternative energy source.

We will quote from a study series made by Airbus at the turn of the century. It’s today 20 years old but its ideas and conclusions are more relevant than ever.

Figure 1. Hydrogen powered airliner from Airbus study. Source: Airbus study presentation.

Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Why e in ePlane shall stand for environment, Part 7.

January 31, 2020, ©. Leeham News: We now look at ways to increase the fuel efficiency of our airliner and by it, improve the CO2 situation for our environment.

Let’s start with understanding where we are with the efficiency of our present air transport system. To get a feel for where we are we will compare it to our road transport system.

Figure 1. A principal view of a two-spool airliner turbofan. Source: Wikipedia.

Read more

Leasing industry sees a role in airline sustainability work

By Bjorn Fehrm

January 22, 2020, ©. Leeham News, Dublin: The yearly Air Finance Journal conference finished its second day with a Q&A with the top executives of the Leasing industry.

The Leasing companies buy 40% of all new airliners from the likes of Airbus and Boeing, to later rent them to the airlines on a monthly basis.

With 40% of all new aircraft delivered to these companies, their view on where we are in the cycle and what are the main challenges facing air transport is important.

The main topics during the three-day conference are the state of the airlines, the ease or difficulty to finance the purchase of $50bn of aircraft per year and the growing issue of air transport and the environment.

Read more