Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival, Part 10

October 12, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In the last Corner we discussed the challenges of the nacelle outlet for an SST (SuperSonic Transport). Now we will discuss SST engines and what are the key technical challenges for these engines.

We start this week by looking at some design constraints for the engine which we don’t have in Subsonic airliner engines.

Figure 1. A generic mixed Turbofan SST engine with ConDi nozzle. Source: GasTurb. Read more

Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival, Part 9

By Bjorn Fehrm

October 5, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In the last Corner we discussed the challenges an efficient inlet poses for an SST (SuperSonic Transport).

Now we go to the back of the nacelle and look at the outlet.

Figure 1. The Concorde nacelle with intake and nozzles. Source: Google images.

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Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival, Part 8

By Bjorn Fehrm

September 28, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In the last Corner we started looking at the biggest challenge for an SST, the powerplant. We first discussed the most fundamental problem of the engine, the level of Ram drag for an SST engine.

Now we continue with the challenges of the Nacelle. This week we talk intakes.

Figure 1. The Concorde nacelle with its Multi-Shock inlet. Source: Google images.

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Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival, Part 7

By Bjorn Fehrm

September 21, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In the last Corner we looked at the heating of the aircraft when cruising at high Mach.

Now we will address the biggest problem for supersonic airliners, the engines and nacelles.

Figure 1. The Concorde engine and nacelle. Source: Google images.

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Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival, Part 5

By Bjorn Fehrm

September 7, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In the last Corner we looked at the drag hump which is created by several supersonic effects when an SST (SuperSonic Transport) passes Mach 1.

Now we will look at other aerodynamic problems facing an SST.

Figure 1. The Aerion AS2 SST with its main systems. Source: Aerion Supersonic.

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Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival, Part 4

By Bjorn Fehrm

August 31, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In the last Corner we discussed supersonic lift wave drag and how suddenly the length aspect ratio is more important than wingspan aspect ratio.

Now we talk about the problem of going from subsonic to supersonic flight.

Figure 1. The Supersonic drag hump. Source: Wikipedia.

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Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival, Part 3

By Bjorn Fehrm

August 24, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In the last Corner we discussed how supersonic wave drag can be higher than any other drag for a blunt fuselage trying to fly at supersonic speeds. If we try to fly supersonically with a Dreamliner fuselage, the volume wave drag is four times as large as the whole Dreamliner drag when flying at its normal cruise speed.

Besides wave drag based on bodies volumes we also have wave drag when we angle lift surfaces like wings against air to create lift.

Figure 1. The last Supersonic transport, the Concorde. Source: Wikipedia.

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Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival, Part 2

By Bjorn Fehrm

August 17, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In the last Corner we outlined several challenges facing a supersonic airliner or business jet.

We will now go through these challenges one by one. We start with the aerodynamic challenge.

Figure 1. The last Supersonic transport, the Concorde. Source: Wikipedia.

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Bjorn’s Corner: Supersonic transport revival

By Bjorn Fehrm

August 10, 2018, ©. Leeham News: The interest in civil supersonic flight has been revived in the last years. Aerion Supersonic is well advanced with its AS2 supersonic business jet and there are several projects looking at restarting supersonic airliner service, 15 years after the Concorde stopped flying.

We will examine the unique challenges facing these projects in a series of Corners.

Figure 1. The latest rendering of the Aerion AS2 supersonic business jet. Source: Aerion Supersonic.

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Bjorn’s Corner: Largest navigation change since radar, Part 8

August 03, 2018, ©. Leeham News: In seven articles we have discussed the largest change in how air navigation is done since the Second World War when Radar was invented.

It’s time to summarize the changes and what it will mean for how we fly in the future.

Figure 1. Airbus Vahana Air Taxi concept. Source: Airbus.

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