Odds and Ends: A320ceo production to end in 2018–PW; responds to 777X RFI

A320 Current Engine Option: The Airbus A320ceo production will end in 2018, according to David Hess, the president of Pratt & Whitney. Hess made the remarks today at the annual PW media day.

Hess said PW anticipates delivering an aggregate of 8,000 V2500 engines by the time the A320ceo winds down.

GTF to have >1m hours by year-end 2015: Hess also said the GTF will have accumulated more than 1m hours of tests and operations by the end of 2015 and more than 3m hours by the time the Boeing 737 MAX enters service in 4Q2017.

PW revenue will double from $12.7bn today: Hess said revenue will double by the end of 2020, driven by the GTF and aftermarket support. “The engines that we are developing today will define PW.”

Second GTF variant enters flight test: The Mitsubishi variant of the GTF made its first flight yesterday.

PW responds to Boeing RFI for 777X engine: in the 90,000-100,000 lb class. The benefits of GTF grow the larger the engine, says Hess.

9 Comments on “Odds and Ends: A320ceo production to end in 2018–PW; responds to 777X RFI

  1. “GTF to have >1m hours by year-end 2015: Hess also said the GTF will have accumulated more than 1m hours of tests and operations by the end of 2015 and more than 3m hours by the time the Boeing 737 MAX enters service in 4Q2013.”

    1 million hours? 737 Max wil EIS after 2017. feel free to adjust & delete my reply. rgds

    • Whether 737 MAX EIS is on schedule in 4Q2017 or before (as Boeing would like) or later remains to be seen. 4Q2017 is when Southwest is to get the first MAX.

  2. CEO ends production in 2018… that’s pretty much in line with what Airbus’ Tom Williams said at last years NEO press briefing. 30 months after NEO EIS, production would be converted over to NEO. It shouldn’t be shocking to hear the engine companies in line with this. The thought that an airline would continue to take the old technology engines, along with the NEO extra weight whether they wanted it or not, was always sort of a fools game. Airbus have essentially forced the Airlines to convert to NEO. Interesting gambit.

  3. leehamnet :
    Whether 737 MAX EIS is on schedule in 4Q2017 or before (as Boeing would like) or later remains to be seen. 4Q2017 is when Southwest is to get the first MAX.

    But I think we all agree it is not going to happeni n 4Q 2013 – as mentioned in the article.
    Even not Boeing anticipates that – but should it happen, it would be a true Dreamliner! :-))

  4. It appears that all my concerns about the fuel efficiency of the LEAPX eng. with
    it’s Boeing imposed fan-diameter, for adequate ground clearance on the MAX
    were unwarranted! Go MAX go!

  5. Does it reall matter how many flying hours are on the GTF when the MAX EIS? To me, no it doesn’t as Boeing has not committed to the B-737MAX-GTF.

    • It could matter a great deal to Boeing if the performance numbers for the GTF are anywhere near as good as people seem to be hinting/speculating they are.

      I wonder how much of a look Boeing has taken at the GTF performance numbers and how much they have spoken to P&W about them. I would find it hard to believe they would neglect something so basic as this. It seems to indicate that Boeing is not impressed with the GTF as presented, or they don’t quite believe what P&W are telling them orrrr….???

  6. Further to my May 2 comments and based on Flt. int. Mag. dated Apr. 16, ’12,
    page 36, the 737MAX is apparently NOT at the final stages of defining the a/p
    Spec. as I and most of you assumed, because “Boeing and CFM are (still)
    considering increasing the fan diameter to 69 in. when the 737MAX.s firm
    configuration completed around mid 2013.” 2013!
    What if that fan-diameter, still does not provide the required fuel-efficiency, to
    match or better the overall operating-costs of the MAX, compared to the NEO?

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