2019 Outlook: Will Bombardier exit Commercial aircraft?

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Assessing the future of COMAC programs

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US, EU ignore Chinese, Russian subsidies

Nov. 15, 2016, © Leeham Co.: Government subsidies to commercial aircraft companies appear to be increasing despite the 12-year disputes before the World Trade Organization between Europe and the US over Airbus and Boeing aid. Yet the US… Read More

From zero to 10,000 in 50 years; can COMAC duplicate this achievement?

By Bjorn Fehrm October 19, 2016, ©. Leeham Co: Airbus delivered its 10,000 aircraft last week (Figure 1), an A350-900 delivered to Singapore Airlines. Delivering the 10,000 aircraft after 50 years of start of project is impressive, especially… Read More

Irkut MC-21, first analysis

By Bjorn Fehrm Subscription required. Introduction Feb. 08, 2016, © Leeham Co: We recently covered China’s COMAC C919 and now the time has come to the other new narrow body aircraft from the old Communist bloc, the Russian MC-21…. Read More

Bjorn’s Corner: Exciting 2016

29 January 2016, ©. Leeham Co: In the corner of two weeks ago we did a retrospective of 2015. Time for looking ahead. The year of 2016 will be quite interesting. We had entry into service of the… Read More

Bjorn’s Corner: Russian aircraft industry.

22 August 2015, ©. Leeham Co: The Russian air show MAKS is taking place in Moscow, on the airfield of Zhukovsky, Southeast of Moscow. The town of Zhukovsky is called the Aero-City of the Russian federation. It houses… Read More

More bizarre twists in the tanker saga

Update, 10:00AM PDT: Defense News has this item that adds more to this increasingly goofy story. A firm named World Aviation Maintenance Co. from Omaha, Neb., is identified as the US company involved in this story–but Google does… Read More